Three Days of the Oyster-Catcher (Part 3) Headland of the Picts

Sun in Gemini

Headland of the Picts – Burghead and, beyond, the expanse of Findhorn Beach

The Moray Firth is vast, wild and beautiful. Examined on a map it resembles a child’s geometry exercise in triangles, with the coast between its ‘origin’ at Inverness and far-away Fraserburgh being a virtually flat west-east baseline. From Fraserburgh the great inlet of the Moray Firth reaches northwards into the North Sea. The final line in the triangle, from Inverness moving north-east, ends at the tip of Scotland: John o’ Groats.

The vast Moray Firth; a small section of which formed the northern boundary of our Silent Unicorn weekend.

Our huge geographic triangle pivots around Inverness -which is also the place where Loch Ness meets the sea. What we know as Loch Ness today is the result of the shearing of two vast tectonic plates four-hundred million years ago. This geological event produced a ‘line’ of fracture…

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